GermanLook Forums  

Go Back   GermanLook Forums > Technical Section > Body

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old August 11th 2008, 02:25
shakajava's Avatar
shakajava shakajava is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Moon Base Alpha
Posts: 18
Have any of you painted your car with a brush, roller, or ???

Has any one here done this to your car?

http://board.moparts.org/ubbthreads/...0&fpart=1&vc=1

I ran across this over the weekend and read far into it. A must read! I would like to give it a shot myself instead of paying some one a lot $$$ just to get some paint on a car.
I have been looking into maybe using topside boat paint. I figure if its tough enough for salt water it must be good for the road. Right?
Have any of you painted your car with a brush, roller, or ???
__________________
What's in the garage..
71' Super Beetle
69' Beetle
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old August 15th 2008, 22:24
shakajava's Avatar
shakajava shakajava is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Moon Base Alpha
Posts: 18
Well, I did some more searching for more info and decided to go the HVLP method of painting instead of a brushing and roller job. I found some really good info on Samba and on another site. Take a read for yourself. Some of it gave me a good chuckle.

http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/vie...er=asc&start=0

http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=248173

http://www.easypaintyourcar.com/

I'm not promoting anything here! Just wanted to let you know you might not need to spend a LOT, I mean A LOT of money to paint your car!

I will let you know how it all turns out as I go through the process of paint my cars.
__________________
What's in the garage..
71' Super Beetle
69' Beetle
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old December 7th 2009, 01:00
rust eez rust eez is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 2
I have not yet done this method but I already purchased everything to do it.
I am just finishing up on the welding and body work.
My current bug is being built for my son and I figure that he will scratch and dent it up anyhow so why not a 50$ paint job. If it's a 10ft car then it's good enough for me.
I will let you know how it works when its ready.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old December 7th 2009, 16:52
owdlvr's Avatar
owdlvr owdlvr is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Canada - West Coast
Posts: 724
Last April I decided my '69 needed a paint job. I turned part of my garage into a spray booth and completed the job with a Princess Auto touch-up paint gun. If I had scheduled an extra day for practice, it would have come out better...but I wasn't looking for a show shine. A 10/20 was going to be fine as far as I was concerned. Keep in mind that all of this, from driving into the garage and then driving out, was done in 4 days.

Post copied over from another site:

Quote:
A couple of weekends ago I started to attack the rusty sections on the '69. It's mostly all stone-chips or similar, but it definitely needed attention. Even with a spectrometer I couldn't get the paint matched correctly...so what do you do?

Somehow I got it into my head that my buddies and I could strip, prep, paint and reassemble the car over the Easter weekend.

...in my garage. Yeah, I've lost it. But really, I couldn't show up to the Spring Thaw with "patches" the '69 beetle! I've painted portions of one car in my life, and it turned out quite well (had we ever gone back to wetsand out the orange peel). So with some luck, this will work out alright. The paint, currently, is a 20/20 paint job (at 20 feet or 20mph it looks great), or perhaps 30/30 with the rust now. If I can get a 10/10 or 20/20...and know the rust has been stopped...I'll be happy.

5:20pm, I pulled the car into the garage:


12:00am, with a long stop for dinner at a friend's place:




And now for the photos of things we discovered along the way...


I can say I never thought the rear windows / feet method would really work. I have pop-outs waiting, so broken glass here wasn't a problem. Amazed at how easy it was!


Broke the windshield, lower left hand corner. Damnit! not in the budget!


Gutted the doors, 1-piece windows going back in. No time to chase down vent-window doors.


Thankfully I didn't break the rear glass!


The worst surprise removing the front fenders had for us.



The front apron, however, is bad. It's been in an accident, repaired with cheap repair panels and bondo. I totally forgot to order a repair panel for this, so my buddies Scott and Ian have been working out the best way to patch it up with good steel.


Left rear quarter...I expected much worse.


Worst part of the Right Rear Quarter.


Aluminum tape, painted over. Awww crap. What is this hiding?


Scott and Ian's progress on the front Apron before we called it a night.

-Dave
__________________
--
'71 Type 1 - Rally Project
'58 Type 1 - I bought an early...
'75 Type 1 - Family Heirloom
'93 Chevy 3500 pickup - Cummins Swap
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old December 7th 2009, 16:53
owdlvr's Avatar
owdlvr owdlvr is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Canada - West Coast
Posts: 724
And the rest...

Quote:
I've finally caught up on sleep from this project. I figured out that by Monday evening I had over 120 hours into it, and that doesn't include all the time Connor, Scott, Wayne, Eric, Ian and Craig put in.

So to answer the age-old car-nut question...Can you paint a car in your garage over a weekend? Yes (if it's four days).

Would you want to? No. But alas, I did it anyways.

When I last posted it was Thursday night, and I had just finished stripping the car down for sanding:



Friday morning started with sanding...lots and lots of sanding. Connor and I sanded the car from Friday morning to saturday evening, while Scott went around welding up all the holes we were uncovering. The short version:






Scott welding holes near the windows...


Connor trying some welding out after being totally bored sanding.


Fenders back on, almost done sanding!


Spray booth built - I essentially built a five-sided box using 3mil plastic sheeting and tuck tape. Fully covered and sealed the floor before building the walls. The walls are held up by 4x4 blocks of wood screwed into the ceiling, and then they are tuck-taped to both the ceiling and around the floor edge. The wood holds the weight, and the tape seals it off. We agreed that painting the ceiling a bit didn't matter, but the floor and the rest of the garage needs to be over-spray free. There's a couple of home furnace filters cut into the walls near the floor which had fans sucking air to the outside. Apparently that was a huge no-no, as sparks off the brushes in the fan motors can ignite the paint fumes. Better to blow INTO the booth through filters and offer a filtered exit. The air hose and water hose were cut into the booth and sealed. Entry and exit to the booth was via a slit in the wall -> simply tape it off after you slide through.

I have no photos of the priming stage, and actually little of the spraying. By the time we had hit Saturday night and I was priming it...the train was in full-blast-finish mode. Priming went just fine, I had good coverage on all panels with little or no orange peel. I did, however, manage to create four big runs though. Runs come from laying it on too thick too fast, and are a real pain. You can paint a panel, and it looks PERFECT...walk away and come back 30sec later, still perfect. Another 30sec and the damned thing is slumping towards the floor.

Wayne, Eric and I woke up saturday morning and sanded out the runs in about 45min. It wasn't too difficult, and I figured the mistakes had happened...so the car was cleaned off with reducer, run over with a tack cloth and I got to mixing paint.

The good news is I had figured out how to paint the fenders. During my priming passes, it was the fenders that caused me the most problems. Trying to to spray around the curves evenly caused me the run issues. When it came to paint, though, the fenders were working out perfectly.

And then I hit the roof...in more ways then one.


In the photo above you can see the roof run we had to sand out, just how massive it really was. I ran the roof on both sides, both doors, the rear decklid and a bit on the front apron.

At this point I had pretty much reached my limit. All that sanding to completely blow it. Wayne and Eric, though, saved my butt. They calmly mentioned that we'd sand it out, and have a go again on sunday morning.

Monday started for me at 7:30am, and hours of sanding. Wayne and Eric quickly showed up and sanded out the massive runs I had made. There was chat over who was going to spray the second and third coats...but eventually I lost out. It was my car, I'd be holding the gun again. While they joined Scott on the pump track near my house, I mixed the paint and held my breath...








This photo is why you use a professional paint booth, and not one built in your garage. A week later and my eyelashes are still white. Think about that.


The second and third coats, I'm proud to say, went on without any runs. They most certainly have bad orange peel, but for that is to be expected. When you spray, the first bit should be almost a light misting...you wait till it gets tacky and then ideally lay on a fairly heavy coat, almost to the point of running. Alas, you need to have some good experience to hit the 'almost running stage' without going over. If you don't get it right, and go too light or two far away, you're going to get orange peel...that rough paint surface. If you lay on enough paint, though, you can sand out your orange peel later.




10:30pm Monday night. The booth comes down, the paint is finished. I'm technically a day behind on my planned schedule...but at least I only have to worry about reassembly at this point!


Wednesday morning, driving to the windshield shop for my new glass. Apparently it's completely legal to do this, as long as you're wearing eye protection. At 5deg C, however, I don't recommend it!

And finally...finished. It's missing a bit of trim, and a horn, but the clips are in the mail.





Finish wise, it's a 5/5 to 20/20 depending on the light and who you ask (20 feet, or passing at 20mph). Quite frankly, for a garage paint job rushed over four days...I can't complain! And the rot we found in the car that was unknown previous would have caused serious issues by the end of the summer. So all in all, I'm happy to have done it. More happy that it's over though!

-Dave
__________________
--
'71 Type 1 - Rally Project
'58 Type 1 - I bought an early...
'75 Type 1 - Family Heirloom
'93 Chevy 3500 pickup - Cummins Swap
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old December 8th 2009, 16:56
johnnyvee's Avatar
johnnyvee johnnyvee is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Jacksonville,Fl
Posts: 130
crazy work
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old December 14th 2009, 13:22
Pickpocket Pickpocket is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 4
This is similar to the paint job I did to my last Super. Complete disassembly, chemically stripped the paint, rattle-can prime/paint and reassembly in 8 days. Drove it like that for two years....runs and all. Had good intentions of fixing my mistakes on the paint but then the 1915 turbo went in and there was no way I was taking it off the road for another week. As good of an experience as that was, my current Super will be stripped down and prepped for paint in my garage then towed to Maaco for a couple of coats of something that will last longer than a year.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:56.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
© www.GermanLook.net 2002-2017. All Rights Reserved