GermanLook Forums  

Go Back   GermanLook Forums > General > Project Builds

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #166  
Old January 23rd 2012, 03:21
owdlvr's Avatar
owdlvr owdlvr is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Canada - West Coast
Posts: 774
Annnnndddd...here's today's progress.

Rear harness ready to be installed into the car:


...and as you can see, wiring can be a rather messy project!


Shortly thereafter, I managed to get the harness squeezed in past the dreaded foam, and then hooked up on the inside to the main harness.


And with the wiring harness well on it's way to completion, I figured I should start on a job I've been avoiding for a little while. The headliner.


Now, in the back of my mind I had always planned on installing the headliner without any of the padding. It's just race-car building habit, and with all the weight I've gained in wiring and electrics I'll happily take a few ounces here and there. It is, however, a decision I might live to regret. On the B-Pillars, I did need to pad the clamps as it was clear they were going to tear into the vinyl over time. A fleece blanket sacrificed a few scraps, and the fear of tearing was eliminated.




Without any padding, getting the B-Pillars wrinkle free is a serious challenge. The issue at the top is the mounting plate for the assist-straps, and can't really be avoided. At the bottom, it would seem it's more a case of my lack of experience vs. any real issue with the car or headliner. Trying to work out how to stretch the vinyl, and glue it down, is a challenge probably best fought with experience.


I did manage to eliminate a bunch of the wrinkles and waves up top, and a few down below. For whatever reason I missed taking photos of them though. Moving on to the Passenger side, you'd think the experience of the driver's side would help, but now everything is in mirror image! The top detail shows the main reason why I might change my mind on the padding...any of the "left-over" padding from before is going to show through as bubbles. 'Course, if I start padding now...that might make the b-pillar section look even worse. Hmmmm....


After completing the two pillars I decided to call it a night. Slow and steady is going to win the Headliner battle.

-Dave
__________________
'71 Type 1 - Rally Project
'58 Type 1 - I bought an early!?!
'73 Type 1 - Proper Germanlook project
'68 Type 1 - Interm German 'look' project
'75 Type 1 - Family Heirloom
'93 Chevy 3500 pickup - Cummins Swap
Reply With Quote
  #167  
Old January 24th 2012, 05:49
owdlvr's Avatar
owdlvr owdlvr is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Canada - West Coast
Posts: 774
Around Christmas Time, when I mentioned to any of my VW friends that I was planning on installing my own headliner they all called me nuts. "No really, you're going to pay someone to do that right?" was the typical response. Rarely do I think about paying someone to work on my car...but wow, would I every consider it now! Headliner isn't impossible, but it is damned difficult! I'm still not even sure I'm going to keep it. There is one spot on the B-Pillar that really annoys me, and now that I've done more I'm not sure I'll be happy with it. On the one hand, it's turning out way better then my '69 headliner ever was...and lets be honest, at the end of the day I'm taking this car racing. BUT, and this is a big but, I'm not convinced the level of craftsmanship on this part matches the rest of the car. From day one I wanted a car that was finished to "magazine standards...and so far, the headliner isn't doing it for me. Gotta sleep on it, and I'm going to finish the job to the end. I mean, I might as well assemble the car before I decide it's all gotta come out to be redone. Waves I see right now may settle out, or end up hidden by some piece of equipment I haven't installed yet.


I did decide this afternoon that installing the headliner without any padding was going to be a waste of time. The C-Pillars would be so challenging to have look "right" I just couldn't wrap my head around it. Living in small town BC doesn't leave much in terms of shopping options at 6pm, so I came up with the best thing I could find. It's polyester, so it won't rot, and the thickness is about right. Having no record of what the padding shapes looked like, I used a combination of google and common sense to come up with something reasonable.


First up is the 'rear window' section. Wow was that a challenge! It's a simple piece of vinyl for crying out loud, why did it almost beat me!?! :P So, overall it's not _bad_, and I'm not really sure how I would have pulled out the slight wrinkles around the corner...so I can live with those. But the top bar has two waves in it, due to the padding underneath. The bottom ends aren't even (due to the padding not being exactly the same)...and I discovered what happens if you hit the vinyl with too much heat on the lower right. Hmph. For the moment I haven't decided on what I'm doing with the firewall (Dynamat, carpet, bare?) so I'm not yet sure what I'll do to fix any of the issues (if anything). I was mildly discouraged at this point, but figuring that I'm in this far, I pressed on.

With the rear quarter panel sections I discovered a new and interesting problem. Nowhere in my head did I think about the fact that I've moved the firewall in by 3". This headliner piece, which already seemed complex enough to mount, was going to need to be modified to accommodate. I went slow, reeeeaaallly slow. But in the end, I'm actually pretty stoked with how good its looking. There are some big waves/wrinkles in the far right that would normally be hidden by the rear seat back. Not quite sure what I'm going to do, but the "under window" piece is technically long enough to go over this part.


With that completed I decided I really didn't want to be up another hour to do the passenger side. One one hand I'm starting to feel comfortable with the job, but on the other hand when I'm tired is likely when I'm going to screw up really badly.


Before heading to write this, though, I decided to install some Dynamat on the roof. Initially I wasn't going to, mostly due to adding yet more weight, but then I thought about it and realized I would have to do a whole second headliner if I ever changed my mind! With that, I tossed in three strips of Dynamat. When doing a panel, you actually don't have to cover the whole thing (despite what Dynamat might tell you), but you do need to do enough to make sure you stop the panel from resonating. I think the rule is 25% coverage in the center of the panel, but I couldn't be bothered to measure or cut the stuff. Just spend, heat and apply :P Just how effective is it?

http://www.youtube.com/embed/YH0bwv1henY

I'm knocking on the panel with the same force.

-Dave
__________________
'71 Type 1 - Rally Project
'58 Type 1 - I bought an early!?!
'73 Type 1 - Proper Germanlook project
'68 Type 1 - Interm German 'look' project
'75 Type 1 - Family Heirloom
'93 Chevy 3500 pickup - Cummins Swap

Last edited by owdlvr; January 24th 2012 at 06:05.
Reply With Quote
  #168  
Old January 25th 2012, 04:14
owdlvr's Avatar
owdlvr owdlvr is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Canada - West Coast
Posts: 774
Well, there are good days...and bad days. And sometimes they occur on the same night in the garage!

First up, the bad news...cracked the paint, on the roof...from the inside. Long story short, I slipped while massaging the area around the rollbar. It was a stupid mistake, but one I can't take back. Of course, you just know 6 milliseconds before I did this my brain said "wait, you should move that...nope!" :P


On to the good news! You know the best part about race cars? They have sponsorship decals. hahahaha


The passenger side C-Pillar portion went in relatively easily. Its funny how much you forget just with a night of sleep. Do I pull here, and glue there first...or over here? It mostly went okay, but I have bigger waves in the front lower portion that are visible. I'm starting to relax a bit about the overall look, I mean...at the end of the day its going to look good. And, quite frankly, a couple of ripples in the headliner aren't going to slow me down any :P

After a big shop clean, I started on the main headliner section. I can see how this would be challenging in a normal car. With the roll bar, it's super annoying! To make it more interesting, the roll bar just happens to be right where a headliner bow is. Awesome.


So far I've managed to get the rear section pretty tight, but once you get to the roll bar I'm having difficulty getting the material to pull tight enough forward.


And here's where I've left it for the night. Now that I'm able to get some tension on it, I got the garage up to 20deg C, and will let it sit overnight. Perhaps that will help creases to relax a little. If I'm honest, I really wish I had a friend who did interiors to come help finish it. With the roll bar its just a bit trickier then I'm comfortable with, considering the challenge I found the other parts to be. But no such friend exists...so I guess I'm on my own!


-Dave
__________________
'71 Type 1 - Rally Project
'58 Type 1 - I bought an early!?!
'73 Type 1 - Proper Germanlook project
'68 Type 1 - Interm German 'look' project
'75 Type 1 - Family Heirloom
'93 Chevy 3500 pickup - Cummins Swap
Reply With Quote
  #169  
Old January 26th 2012, 04:38
owdlvr's Avatar
owdlvr owdlvr is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Canada - West Coast
Posts: 774
Hmmm...not sure how I'm feeling about this tonight.

I had a good chat on the phone this morning with a local club member, and got some good PM's with tips. Went down to the garage around 8pm and started practicing with the binder clips, pulling and testing and sorting out exactly what I had to do in what order. Took quite a bit of time to get myself sorted, as I kept getting extra material showing up in the front corners. After a while I got that dialed, and could repeat the steps successfully without any major waves or issues. With the front still clipped up I hopped out of the car and practiced going down the side to the rear. It went super easy, I dialed it in on the first try. I then did a perfect repeat, and declared myself ready to go. Unfortunately, in hindsight, I made my fatal error when I got out of the car.

I dunno about you guys, but when I'm in the car working, I have a habit of getting out of the driver's side. (It's the door I always use!) In doing so, I did my side-practice down the driver's side of the car, since it was right there. Everything went relatively smoothly up front, outside of messing up the B-Pillar fold on the driver's side, the whole side went quite well. I'd call the driver's side a pass. Moving on to the passenger side, though, and instantly I knew I had a problem. In the end, I've figured out that the roll-bar has something to do with the issue. I know the roll bar was closer to the passenger side of the roof then the driver's side, as I had to clearance the interior body panels to even get the vinyl past it...so there is something different going on. I suspect when I pulled the headliner forward and glued it to the windshield, the roll bar was giving me a false impression that I had it pulled tight enough.

Well, crap.







Ultimately, I suspect it's all coming out. But that's my "just walked up from the garage to download the photos" impression. I'm going to assemble the car right to finished before I decide whether or not it needs a full replacement. There is still lots of stuff that needs to go into the car that may hide it. Roll bar padding, reading lamps, etc. Once the car is assembled, if it bugs me, I'll pull all the glass, the headliner, and have it redone. No sense in freaking out about it right now...either it needs to come out, or it doesn't.

-Dave
__________________
'71 Type 1 - Rally Project
'58 Type 1 - I bought an early!?!
'73 Type 1 - Proper Germanlook project
'68 Type 1 - Interm German 'look' project
'75 Type 1 - Family Heirloom
'93 Chevy 3500 pickup - Cummins Swap
Reply With Quote
  #170  
Old January 26th 2012, 14:22
NO_H2O's Avatar
NO_H2O NO_H2O is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Stockbridge, GA.
Posts: 2,810
Headliners are a pain. At least to me. I had one put in my black car by a friend as I watched and helped. I put one in my son's and one in my daughter's bugs. Yours looks ok to me. The headliner will relax and smooth out after the car sits a while. It will do it even faster when it is out in the sun. You could use a heat gun but be very careful.
__________________
NO_H2O
72 1302 Smack Black GL
73 Bus (2L CIS Powered)
66 Beetle, 73 Standard Beetle
72 Pinzgauer 710M
Volksport Kafer Gruppe
Reply With Quote
  #171  
Old January 27th 2012, 22:13
Kafer_Mike Kafer_Mike is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 270
Try taking a hair dryer to the wrinkles. Get them warm (not too hot) by waving the heat over them, working them from their ends to their center. You can do the same thing with a paint stripping heat gun though that is better left to the professionals. Don't ask my how I know.
__________________
Kafer_Mike
Build 'em fast...or let 'em sit.
Reply With Quote
  #172  
Old January 28th 2012, 02:41
owdlvr's Avatar
owdlvr owdlvr is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Canada - West Coast
Posts: 774
Yeah, I'll be playing with some heat in a few days...gotta give it a rest for a while ;-)

Tonight was a quick night the garage, gotta get up early tomorrow for a Seattle trip. Back when I mounted the front brake mounts, I wasn't a fan of the bolts that I had. But I was potentially needing to roll the car around, so I tossed 'em on anyways. Since tonight was going to be a quick night, I popped off the rotors to swap them to proper hex-head bolts.


With done, I mounted the calipers...


And finished off the last of the brake lines.


Tossed the gas flap door on as well, since I've almost kicked it off the stairs a thousand times :P


I probably had time to bleed the brakes, but I have a rule about never bleeding a brake system for the first time before bed. My Audi rally car taught me that one...with a leaking fitting inside the car :P Always bleed at the start of a session, so you can check it carefully at regular intervals to ensure there are no leaks!

-Dave
__________________
'71 Type 1 - Rally Project
'58 Type 1 - I bought an early!?!
'73 Type 1 - Proper Germanlook project
'68 Type 1 - Interm German 'look' project
'75 Type 1 - Family Heirloom
'93 Chevy 3500 pickup - Cummins Swap
Reply With Quote
  #173  
Old January 30th 2012, 03:49
owdlvr's Avatar
owdlvr owdlvr is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Canada - West Coast
Posts: 774
Didn't get a whole lot accomplished this weekend. I got a phone call from a buddy that my boxes were starting to pile up in his shop...so Saturday was "drive 12 hours and pickup my parts all over the west". Unfortunately it would appear that some sponsors like to send really big boxes for only 1 small part out of an order of 5 parts! Sigh. Today I opted to actually use my Ski Pass for the first time...probably a good call seeing as I live 35min away from Whistler, and haven't been yet :P

But never fear, I did make it into the garage for a couple of items.


First up was installing the fuel filler inlet. It's a bit of a mental puzzle figuring out how to get this thing in! I distinctly remember removing it after the fuel tank, and with the nipple still installed. Of course you can't get it in the car that way...took a bit to figure that out. But, now that it's in (just need hose clamps) the whole process seems really simple. Remove nipple, slide through quarter panel from the outside. Done! I do need to buy a new fuel cap, though, this one is looking a little ratty.


When I went to finish the job, I was reminded on why the aftermarket often sucks. Factory breather setup on the top...aftermarket replacement parts down below. Yeah, that ain't gonna work. Time to see what Samco has in the universal hose selections...


I also made the attempt to reinstall the fuel sender with the required O-Ring. I know this isn't going to be an easy job, but any suggestions? Perhaps I just need a second person...one to push down, and another to tap the sender around to lock it in place?

The fuel pump relays required a bit of modification. They come with the power terminals wider then a standard .250" connector...which is what my relay mounts use. A quick few minutes with the angle grinder sizes the terminals to the width I need. The relay mounts did require a bit of modification for the "K" terminal, which is the one that takes in the tach-signal. With these relays, as long as the tach is providing a signal the fuel pumps will run.




And finally, I closed up my garage session tonight with the last two pieces of the headliner. The under quarter windows are done, and I can officially call my headliner installed!


...Time to stop with these mini-jobs and get back to some heavy hitting nights in the garage that cut the list shorter and shorter

-Dave
__________________
'71 Type 1 - Rally Project
'58 Type 1 - I bought an early!?!
'73 Type 1 - Proper Germanlook project
'68 Type 1 - Interm German 'look' project
'75 Type 1 - Family Heirloom
'93 Chevy 3500 pickup - Cummins Swap
Reply With Quote
  #174  
Old January 30th 2012, 10:43
Jadewombat's Avatar
Jadewombat Jadewombat is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 159
Great stuff. I've been following this thread for a while. That's frustrating about your headliner. The older I get the more I have to swallow my pride at times and know my limitations about some stuff (mine is exterior paint). Unless you deal with it every day it takes so much longer than the guy who does. Fortunately I found an upholsterer who will come to my house to do the headliner on my bus when the time comes.

Keep up the great work.
__________________
'66 Bus(11-window, CLK rims, disk brakes, IRS, bags, hydr. clutch, Super-1600 w/injection)
Reply With Quote
  #175  
Old January 31st 2012, 05:39
owdlvr's Avatar
owdlvr owdlvr is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Canada - West Coast
Posts: 774
Yeah, its frustrating. But I also knew from the get-go that it was a gamble. I didn't want to risk painting the car, but a headliner is easy enough to re-do!

--------

Man, what a roller coaster night of frustration.

I started off by bleeding the brakes, which should have gone relatively easy. I've got Russell Performance Speed Bleeders on every corner, so with long sections of clear tubing you can bleed the brakes single-handedly. To start the process I always crack one front and one rear caliper, to ensure the master cylinder can push fluid through both circuits. Within moments I could hear fluid hitting the front pan. "That's odd", I thought, "Its usually not that quick." I walked over to the front corner, and fluid is leaking everywhere. Initially I didn't panic...I probably forgot to tighten a fitting or something. But scanning for the source quickly turned to panic and annoyance. How could I possibly have a brand new caliper leaking at the seam between halves!?! I'm mopping up fluid, trying to find tools to remove the caliper when it dawns on me...these calipers have two bleed nipples (to be used on either left or right sides). Um, where is the other bleed nipple?

Ah yes, when you take a nipple with you to the store to ensure you buy the right speed bleeders...PUT IT BACK! :P

With that done, I continued to bleed the brakes. The fronts came up quickly, and easily...but the rears, just would not bleed. I needed to wait until I had someone to work the pedals so I could see what was going on. With that, I moved on. As you can see the handbrake cables I have are quite a bit longer then ideal. When I put the same rear brake kit on my '69, I had the same issue. But the cable housing measures out correctly. I could spend time trying to find ones that are the correct length, or I could fix what I have.


First step, cut off the end ball, and remove the cable and housing from the car.


Next up, I use a cable crimp on each cable. These are crushed on using my vice, and then I solder the housing for extra measure. With that done, you simply reinstall in the car. The clamps hold to the use of the parking brake, and my final step is to heat-shrink the end of the cables so that they don't fray. Its not the most elegant solution, but it's functional.


Funny enough, I've never actually owned a beetle with a properly installed E-Brake boot. Seems they're always torn in some fashion. I highly doubt the Empi one fits properly, and I can't seem to get it to 'snug down' to the tunnel. But I figured I would try the silver out. I won this at a show years ago, and I remembered thinking "When am I ever going to even think of using this in a car!?!" Funny enough, it fits the theme of this one :P


With the brakes completed as far as I could get them, I thought I'd quickly toss the battery into the car. I'd really like to know how I had this thing mounted in my '69 beetle...because it sure doesn't fit this car! The first problem was base...I knew that would be easily solved by finding the additional pieces Optima ships with the battery...but finding them in the garage was another story. Once I finally tracked them down, the battery fit under the "lip", but there was no way I could bolt it down. A bit of time with the angle grinder and one of the plastic mounts...and it was finally mounted. FAR too long for something as simple as the battery!


Thankfully my buddy Scott stopped in, so that meant the two of us could do some 'two-man' jobs. We started on the fuel level sender. I now have the O-Ring, so it's just a simple matter of pressing down and tapping the sender home, right? Okay, seriously. I swear we spent an hour on this. It's been greased, boiled, what-have-you, and will NOT go in. I'm going to have to find the measurements and check that the O-Ring packed was the correct size, because this is ridiculous.

We did, however, manage to bleed the brakes relatively successfully. They aren't perfect, but with all the fluid I ran through we were getting to the end of my stash. Letting the brakes sit for a few days isn't a bad thing either, so hopefully I can get the last of the air out in short order. At least I know there aren't any major issues with any components, and outside of my bleeder mistake, all my fittings were leak free from the start.

To finish the evening, I went back to my wiring. At least I know that's usually successful! I was busy working out the battery cut-off solenoid, along with starter and alternator wiring, when I discovered a new problem. My Autostick starter doesn't fit the Porsche gearbox. The diameter of the mounting face is off. Sigh. You can just see the space between the upper lip and the transmission, but suffice it to say I'll be either working the starter in the lathe, or working the trans to make it fit.


Ah project cars...always fun eh? :P

-Dave
__________________
'71 Type 1 - Rally Project
'58 Type 1 - I bought an early!?!
'73 Type 1 - Proper Germanlook project
'68 Type 1 - Interm German 'look' project
'75 Type 1 - Family Heirloom
'93 Chevy 3500 pickup - Cummins Swap

Last edited by owdlvr; January 31st 2012 at 05:45.
Reply With Quote
  #176  
Old January 31st 2012, 06:16
Steve C's Avatar
Steve C Steve C is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 1,700
Hi

Love your updates. A smear of rubber grease will on the sender o ring works well, and I use a pair of multi grips opened all the way out to turn the sender flange.

Steve
__________________
STI powered 1303 in the works.
Reply With Quote
  #177  
Old January 31st 2012, 16:08
NO_H2O's Avatar
NO_H2O NO_H2O is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Stockbridge, GA.
Posts: 2,810
Bleeding an all new brake system can be a real pain. If the rears are not bleeding right. Try jacking the rear of the car up as high as you can and then bleed them. If you have a high place in the line running to the rear. Air will collect there and it can be hard to get it to move from that spot. I have had to jack one end of the car, use a mighty vac on the bleeder and put pressure on the fluid res. and pump the pedal, just to get all the air to move out of a high spot in the plumbing.
__________________
NO_H2O
72 1302 Smack Black GL
73 Bus (2L CIS Powered)
66 Beetle, 73 Standard Beetle
72 Pinzgauer 710M
Volksport Kafer Gruppe
Reply With Quote
  #178  
Old February 1st 2012, 04:09
owdlvr's Avatar
owdlvr owdlvr is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Canada - West Coast
Posts: 774
For the last week or two I've been feeling more and more frustrated every time I work in the garage. It had gotten to the point, last night, where I considered that I may need some time off to relax and make the car fun again. Regardless, though, I needed to clean the shop today. After a clean of the shop, I was thinking about that darned fuel sender, and thought to myself "If I could get that in, perhaps it will change my attitude." Steve's suggestions above gave me a reason to think it might be possible. But first, I had to clean off the grease we used last night.

And, that was the turning point.

So, should you be reading this thread wondering why you can't get your damned fuel sender in either...allow me to solve your problem. You see, weeks ago, when you prepped your tank for paint...you probably quickly cleaned it since you were giving it a quickie paint job. Perhaps you neglected to remove the old seal before painting the tank? Hahahaha, yeah, that's right. POR-15 sure is 'tough as steel' once it dries! :P Funny enough, once I peeled off the old sender the new one (with gasket) just slid right into the tank.

The whole thing was quite funny to me once I realized...and was just the thing I needed to change my attitude around. And with that, I kept working.

Starter wiring harness assembled. I haven't fully heat-shrunk it as I may make some changes.


Remote battery cut-off solenoid installed and wired. You get a healthy "thunk" when you twist the battery cut-off switch on the dash The wiring going over to the regulator hasn't been locked down, as I anticipate I'll have other wires crisscrossing the area once I put the oil tank in.


With the battery wiring sorted out, I moved back to the regulator and took care of eliminating it for the alternator conversion I've planned on. You might wonder why I took the time to wire up the whole regulator and then remove it...but it was a simple case of needing to confirm I had the three wiring harnesses sorted out correctly before I started making changes. The unconnected wires heading towards the bottom of the photo are the various wires that have yet to be connected to anything.


The next step in the wiring is hooking up the various sensors I'm adding. Before I can wire up the speed sensors, I need to mount them. I had originally worked out a mount for a single sensor, but later decided the rally computer and speedo should each have their own sensor. Thus, I had to weld up a new mount for two sensors. This will mount onto the side of the transmission off the diff-cover bolts.


...and, since i had the welder out, I finished off the exhaust pipe for the gas heater. I'm pretty much ready to mount the front sheet metal (hood and fenders), but will wait to see if I can fill my time until the hood seal arrives. I suspect its easier to install without a hood in the way!


Lastly, I figured I would leave it as a "good night", and quit while I was ahead. ;-)

-Dave
__________________
'71 Type 1 - Rally Project
'58 Type 1 - I bought an early!?!
'73 Type 1 - Proper Germanlook project
'68 Type 1 - Interm German 'look' project
'75 Type 1 - Family Heirloom
'93 Chevy 3500 pickup - Cummins Swap
Reply With Quote
  #179  
Old February 1st 2012, 09:54
Xellex's Avatar
Xellex Xellex is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bucharest, Romania
Posts: 274
Very nice an clean work, I love it!
__________________
www.vw1303s.com
Reply With Quote
  #180  
Old February 2nd 2012, 04:31
owdlvr's Avatar
owdlvr owdlvr is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Canada - West Coast
Posts: 774
Well, I was down in Vancouver tonight for a club meeting...but upon returning home I was stoked to try and get my hour in on the car. I have a rule that says a minimum of one hour per day, and you can't bank any hours nor can you make them up. So, into the garage I went!

Wanting to keep relatively clean, I figured with the battery hooked up I could start checking and trouble shooting the wiring that I've done. I did have to do some work to the front fuse panel, at some point I forgot to bridge the fuse blocks so that half the fuses were powered by the ignition circuit and the other half are powered directly from the battery. Once I diagnosed and fixed that, it all went relatively quickly.

- Warning lights, working.
- Fuel pumps, working...but wow are they loud. Whomever suggested I double rubber-mount them? Definitely going to need to!
- Rally computer, powers up on either the ignition or battery power (selected via switch).
- Gauges that are wired in all power up.
- Gauge lights working (can't test any of the others as they're just wires at the moment)
- Gas Heater powers up, and the pump works

So with that, it was onto the speedo and rally computer sensors. After mounting them, I had to make the wiring harnesses. These have connectors on them just before the harness enters the inside of the body, that way if I'm pulling the transmission for any reason I don't have to take the sensor mount off. I probably would, so I don't damage the sensors, but you never know!


Tough to photograph due to the flash, but the rally computer is pulling numbers off the sensor, and so is the speedometer.


By the time it was all said and done, it was a good two and a half hours in the garage. Tomorrow I'll be starting on either the Kafer bar, or the oil system.

-Dave
__________________
'71 Type 1 - Rally Project
'58 Type 1 - I bought an early!?!
'73 Type 1 - Proper Germanlook project
'68 Type 1 - Interm German 'look' project
'75 Type 1 - Family Heirloom
'93 Chevy 3500 pickup - Cummins Swap
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 2 (1 members and 1 guests)
alexoson
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 21:45.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
© www.GermanLook.net 2002-2017. All Rights Reserved