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  #1  
Old April 22nd 2008, 12:13
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Race Motor Build-up

Since I scrapped the subie-swap due to classing issues I had to build a motor that would be able to get similar power, this should be able to do it.

Thought I'd share my progress with you guys as I build my race motor. I accidentally started assembling it this weekend (you know how it goes, you put all the motor bits in one place and it's hard to keep them apart) so here's some progress pics.

The motor specs:

2165cc turbo
CB super case, 7.0 deck, 10mm head studs
78mm forged race crank
94mm forged pistons w/ total seal 2nd ring
CB 5.7" super race rods, chevy journal
CB 044 cnc mini wedge port heads, ls1 k-motion springs, cb forged 1.3:1 rockers
K8 cam, 107 lc, 308 dur, .491" lift with 1.3:1 rockers
28mm light weight lifters
CB straight cut gears
4 gear dry sump pump
giant oil cooler w/ fan
3gal sump tank
dtm shroud
CB quick tune turbo/efi kit
turbo tbd

nice clean work area..




That didn't last long




purty heads



When I openned the case I found some corrosion, really wasn't expecting it



When men do dishes, this is what we think of...


Got things drying out now ready for some oil


Quick test of the bearings and case, this shot was after i split it again
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Old April 22nd 2008, 12:14
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I didn't get any pics when I checked crank to bearing clearance, but here's a couple of putting the crank gear assembly together. The oven is your friend during this step.





Crank to cam clearance? no problem!


Put the rods on and checked clearance, but apparently those pics didn't upload. :P

Almost buttoned the case up, had case sealant on and everything, before I realized I didn't have a cam plug


That's it for now, I had to cover it all up until I picked up a couple things. I have to verify this but I might be running a distributor-less ignition, so no dizzy shaft either.
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Old April 30th 2008, 18:33
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Part 2!

Alright, back at it again...

This is for a friend to show him how the lifter retainers work



Got the case halves together with sealant and torqued down.



Closer look at the raised barrel seats and you can also see the raised roof on the case



Next up, checking ring gaps. Everything looked good and only had to file a couple.



Here's a close up of a total seal 2nd ring for those that haven't seen one. The main ring has a step machined into it and theres a smaller ring that fits into that step. You position the gaps 180* from each other and it's a "gapless" ring.



While were on the subject of rings, if you're doing rings for the first time you'll notice that the 3 part oil ring has colors on it. It might be red and green or blue and green but both colors need to be seen when you put it together.
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Old April 30th 2008, 18:34
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More...

94's are big mmkay?




Time to put on the 10mm head studs, only theres 3 different lenghts. where do they go? Looking at the barrel seats, the longest studs go on the bottom row close to the oil sump. The middle length go on the top row, 2 per side, one by the fly wheel and one by the fan belt pulley. The shortest ones go in the middle in the top row. One exception to this is 73 and up cases and I think type 3 cases (though i could be wrong). They have a deep stud above #3 by the flywheel and a long stud goes in there instead.




Here you can see a normal stud on the left and deep stud on the right. Also You can see the case savers installed.
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Old April 30th 2008, 18:35
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Now to put the cylinders on... or not. This is as far down as they go. Not something you would normally run into but since I'm building this with 94s, 10mm studs and case savers the head stud registers in the barrels need to be clearanced. A little quality time with the dremel and they fit.








Thats better!
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Old April 30th 2008, 18:37
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With that headache out of the way now I can check crank end play and install the rear main seal.

13lb lightened fly wheel, and the end play tool installed


good endplay numbers with 3 shims


Pulled the fly wheel back off (what a pain) put the o-ring in the flywheel and the rear main seal in the case (thanks for the tool Anton)


Now here's a tip, if you get the fancy chromoly racing gland nut remember it's a 1 1/2" bolt and you can't use the torquemeister on it
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Old April 30th 2008, 18:38
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Got the pistons and cylinders on to check deck height. Make sure pistons are installed right side up (arrows pointing to the flywheel). In order to use the deck height tool correctly it's gotta be torqued down to head torque specs, 26 ft/lbs











Looks pretty good across the board, .069" +/- .001 not too shabby.
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Old April 30th 2008, 18:41
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Before I quit for the night I had to toss on the dry sump pump to see how it looks and make sure everything clears.


Next up is setting up the rocker geometry, and i'll be doing that over the next few days. Final numbers for compression are about 7.7:1 very turbo friendly
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Old May 1st 2008, 08:07
golde60 golde60 is offline
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great post.

thanks for sharing.

what are you using for an engine stand?
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Old May 1st 2008, 19:38
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Its just a regular engine stand made for vw motors with an extra tool tray on the back. I picked it up at bugformance, a local vw shop.
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  #11  
Old May 7th 2008, 07:08
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What a nice project!
Succes with it.

cheers, Stefan
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  #12  
Old August 26th 2008, 07:29
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Anny updates?

Wiebrand
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Racebug is comming to get ya!!!
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  #13  
Old September 9th 2008, 00:34
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I can't believe I forgot to update this.... Well the motor is built and in the car but here's the rest of how it got there.

How to setup proper rocker geometry. Now I know for the most part you can just bolt on rockers, cut your push rods (or find used ones) and go, but it's not the best thing for your motor. Good rocker geometry will prevent excess wear on the valves, guides, lash caps, rockers and push rods. Ideally you want to have a 90* angle between your rocker arm and push rod at half of your total lift. This prevents extreme angles between the rocker, push rod, and lash cap that could wear down your adjusters, push rod tips, rocker tips, and lash caps. This also keeps side-loading the valve step to a minimum which prevents ovalled out valve stem guides.

So here i'm using a dial indicator to figure out total lift at the valve which is .471".


Now if I setup my rockers with no spacers this is what the angle looks like, very bad. The rocker is resting on the back of the lash cap, there's a really bad angle on the push rod to the adjuster cup, and the push rod would probably rub on the push rod tube.






Now using the total lift number I got before I half it to get .2355". At .2355" I need to get the angle between the push rod and the rocker as close to 90* as possible. With .195" worth of rocker block shims, it was as close as I could get and still have enough threads on the rocker studs to bolt it all down.


relaxed


and full lift


Much better with the spacers in. While I'm on the subject of rockers, when you setup your geometry make sure you check how the foot on the rocker meets the lash cap. You want it as close to the middle as possible but slightly offset. The idea behind this is that the action of the rocker sweeping across the lash cap will rotate the valve so that everything wears evenly and prevents the valve from developing hot spots.

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Old September 9th 2008, 00:35
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Now that the rockers are done it's on to the push rods. Pretty basic really. Use an adjustable push rod to find your ideal push rod length and then measure it. Then do it again. Why? The red mark on that cut push rod is why you measure twice and cut once. If I cut on the red mark I would have needed a new set of push rods and do it al over again. You can use a hack saw, dremel, band saw to cut them just make sure you de-burr them before you put the tips in. The best way to get the tips on is to use a pair of old lifters, one on each end, and hammer the tip in like that.



When you put a motor together check and wash every part thoroughly even the fancy shmancy billet parts. These push rod tubes are brand new and they still had metal shavings and cutting lube in them.







Looking good!
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Old September 9th 2008, 00:36
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Couple shots of the sealing surfaces. These are using a softer silicon seal instead of a standard rubber one, we'll see how it holds up.





Pretty close fit! Remember these would have rubbed if I hadn't spaced up the rocker blocks.







Valve covers on and test fitting a type 4 cooler




A (not so)funny story real quick. While I was doing the rockers I kept turning the motor over and over on the stand. Well I didn't have a distributor on it and slowly the dizzy drive shaft backed out... (I think you all know where I'm headed with this). Well I turn the motor over on the stand and I hear this "tink-tink" and my heart just sank. I pulled the dizzy shaft out and I didn't see the washers at all. Checked every where on the ground just in case bu they were still loose in the motor. I found one of them resting on top of the cam timing gear, and got it out with a really long pair of needle nose pliers. The second one fell out after I pulled the sump plate and oil strainer. Whew! Lesson learned, don't get ahead of yourself!
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